The Sin of Gluttony

1. Gluttony is a sin exceedingly contrary to the love of God–it is idolatry! What an odious, swinish, damning sin it is–for a man’s heart to be set upon his belly!

2. Gluttony is self-murder! Though it does not kill suddenly–it kills surely!

3. Gluttony is a deadly enemy to the mind, and to all the noble employments of reason.

4. Gluttony dulls the body as well as the mind. It makes men heavy, and drowsy and slothful.

5. Gluttony is the immediate effect of a carnal mind, and of the damnable sin of flesh-pleasing.

6. Gluttony is the breeder and feeder of all other lusts.

7. Gluttony is a base and beastly kind of sin.

8. Gluttony is a wasteful consumer and devourer of the creatures of God.

9. Gluttony is a most unthankful sin–it takes God’s mercies, and spews them as it were in His face!

10. Gluttony is a sin which turns your own mercies, and wealth, and food–into your snare and deadly ruin. You please your throat–and poison your soul!

11. Gluttony is a thief that robs you of your estates, and devours that which is given you for better uses, and for which you must give account to God.

12. Gluttony is a sin so much the greater–by how much the more delight you have in the committing of it. The sweetest, most voluntary and beloved sin–is the greatest sin. Few sins are more pleasant and beloved than gluttony.

13. Gluttony is the greater sin, because it is so frequently committed. Men live in it as their daily practice and delight. They live for it, and make it the end of other sins. Being turned into beasts–they live like beasts continually!

– Richard Baxter, 1615-1691, Directions against Gluttony

Advertisements
Published in: on October 5, 2019 at 11:29 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags:

The best moment of a Christian’s life

“The day of one’s death is better than the day of one’s birth!” – Ecclesiastes 7:1
“I do not want to live forever.” – Job 7:16

“It is the very joy of this earthly life, to think that it will come to an end.
The best moment of a Christian’s life is his last one, for then he is nearest Heaven.
The only people for whom I have felt any envy have been dying Christians.
It is not a loss to die–it is a lasting, perpetual gain.” – Charles Spurgeon

“For to me, to live is Christ, and to die is gain.” Philippians – 1:21
“My desire is to depart and be with Christ, for that is far better!” – Philippians 1:23

Published in: on September 20, 2019 at 1:59 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags:

Don’t rely on “the Church”

“Tell it to your children, and let your children tell it to their children, and their children to the next generation.” Joel 1:3

In this simple way, by God’s grace, a living testimony for truth is always to be kept alive in the land. The beloved of the Lord are to hand down their witness for the gospel to their heirs, and these again to their next descendants.

This is our first duty–we are to begin at the family hearthHe is a bad preacher, who does not commence his ministry at home. The heathen are to be sought by all means, and the highways and hedges are to be searched–but home has a prior claim, and woe unto those who reverse the order of the Lord’s arrangements.

To teach our children is a personal duty. We cannot delegate it to Sunday School Teachers, or to the church. These can assist us–but cannot relieve us from the sacred obligation. Mothers and fathers must, like Abraham, command their households in the fear of God, and talk with their offspring concerning the wondrous works of the Most High God.

Parental teaching is a natural duty. Who is so fit to look to after child’s well-being, as those who are the authors of his actual being? To neglect the instruction of our offspring is worse than brutish!

Family instruction is necessary for the nation, for the family itself, and for the church of God. By a thousand plots, atheism is covertly advancing in our land, and one of the most effectual means for resisting its inroads is left almost neglected, namely, the instruction of children in the faith. Would that parents would awaken to a sense of the importance of this matter.

It is a pleasant duty to talk of Jesus to our sons and daughters, and the more so because it has often proved to be an accepted work, for God has often saved the children through the parents’ prayers and admonitions.

May every house into which this counsel shall come, honor the Lord in this matter and receive His smile!

Charles Haddon Spurgeon, 1834-1892

“These commandments that I give to you today are to be upon your hearts. Impress them on your children. Talk about them when you sit at home and when you walk along the road, when you lie down and when you get up. Tie them as symbols on your hands and bind them on your foreheads. Write them on the doorframes of your houses and on your gates!” Deuteronomy 6:6-9

“Fathers, do not exasperate your children; instead, bring them up in the training and instruction of the Lord.” Ephesians 6:4

Cast your cares upon Him

A ship is made to go in the water, and no matter how deep the sea nor how wild the tempest–all goes well as long as the water does not get into the ship. The problem of managing a ship, is not to keep the ship out of the water–but to keep the water out of the ship!

In this sinful world, we cannot avoid all cares and trials and temptations. The goal of of true Christian living is to keep these cares and trials and temptations from getting into our souls. Some people let all their frets and worries at once into their hearts–and they soon live out their lives in sourness, irritability, and discontent. They become thus miserable themselves–and they make all around them miserable. They cast, not cooling, healthful, refreshing shade on others–but melancholy, darksome, chilling shadows.

Learn to keep your cares in your hands–and out of your hearts. Nothing in this world is more beautiful than a Christian life with many trials and cares–yet remaining ever peaceful and joyous amid them all. This is the real goal of noble Christian living.

– J.R. Miller

Casting all your care upon him; for he careth for you. – 1 Peter 5:7

Published in: on July 21, 2019 at 1:01 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , ,

Admonition for the Rich

Charge them that are rich in this world, that they be not highminded, nor trust in uncertain riches, but in the living God, who giveth us richly all things to enjoy. – 1 Timothy 6:17

Charge them that are rich in this world, that they be not high-minded. One of the evils to which they are particularly exposed. The idea is, that they should not value themselves on account of their wealth, or look down with pride and arrogance on their inferiors. They should not suppose that they are any better men, or any nearer heaven, because they are wealthy. Property really makes no distinction in the great things that pertain to character and salvation. It does not necessarily make one wise, or learned, or great, or good. In all these things the man who has not wealth may be vastly the superior of him who has; and for so slight and unimportant a distinction as gold can confer, no man should be proud. Besides, let such a man reflect that his property is the gift of God; that he is made rich because God has chosen to arrange things so that he should be; that it is not primarily owing to any skill or wisdom which he has; that his property only increases his responsibility, and that it must all soon be left, and he be as poor as the “beggar that lies at his gate”; and he will see ample reason why he should not be proud.

– Albert Barnes, 1798-1870

Published in: on March 26, 2019 at 3:51 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , ,

Do Everything to the Glory of God

“Whether therefore ye eat, or drink, or whatsoever ye do, do all to the glory of God.” – 1 Corinthians 10:31

This rule is designed to be one of the chief directors of our lives. It is to guide all our conduct, and to constitute a test by which to try our actions. Whatever can be done to advance the honor of God is right; whatever cannot be done with that end is wrong. Whatever plan a man can form that will have this end is a good plan; whatever cannot be made to have this tendency, and that cannot be commenced, continued, and ended with a distinct and definite desire to promote his honor, is wrong, and should be forthwith abandoned.

What a change would it make in the world if this rule were everywhere followed! How differently would even professing Christians live! How many of their plans would they be constrained at once to abandon! And what a mighty revolution would it at once make on earth, should all the actions of men begin to be performed to promote the glory of God!

– Albert Barnes, Barnes Notes

Published in: on March 25, 2019 at 1:04 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: ,

The Poor in Spirit

Blessed are the poor in spirit: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. – Matthew 5:3

To be poor in spirit is to have a humble opinion of ourselves; to be sensible that we are sinners, and have no righteousness of our own; to be willing to be saved only by the rich grace and mercy of God; to be willing to be where God places us, to bear what he lays on us, to go where he bids us, and to die when he commands; to be willing to be in his hands, and to feel that we deserve no favor from him. It is opposed to pride, and vanity, and ambition.

– Albert Barnes, 1798-1870, Barnes Notes

How to be a better Christian

I will meditate on your precepts. Psalms 119:15

There are times when solitude is better than companionship, and silence is wiser than speech. We would be better Christians if we were more alone, waiting on God, and gathering through meditation on his Word spiritual strength for labor in his service. We ought to meditate on the things of God, because by this we get the real nutriment from them. Truth is something like the cluster of the vine: if we wish to have wine from it, we must bruise it; we must press and squeeze it many times. The bruiser’s feet must come down joyfully on the bunches, or else the juice will not flow; and they must tread the grapes well, or else much of the precious liquid will be wasted. So we must, by meditation, tread the clusters of truth, if we wish to get the wine of consolation from it. Our bodies are not nourished by merely taking food into the mouth, but the process which really supplies the muscle, and the nerve, and the sinew, and the bone, is the process of digestion. It is by digestion that the outward food becomes assimilated with the inner life. Our souls are not nourished merely by listening for a while to this, and then to that, and then to the other part of divine truth. Hearing, reading, marking, and learning, all require inwardly digesting to complete their usefulness, and the inward digesting of the truth lies for the most part in meditating on it. Why is it that some Christians, although they hear many sermons, make very slow advances in the divine life? Because they neglect their prayer closets, and do not thoughtfully meditate on God’s Word. They love the wheat, but they do not grind it; they wish to have the grain, but they will not go out into the fields to gather it; the fruit hangs on the tree, but they will not pick it; the water flows at their feet, but they will not stoop to drink it. From such folly deliver us, oh Lord, and let this be our resolve this morning, “I will meditate on your precepts.”

– Charles Haddon Spurgeon, 1834-1892, Morning & Evening

Stand like a Pillar

” But Mordecai bowed not.” – Esther 3:2

There was stern stuff in this old Jew. He was not going to prostrate himself before one so haughty and so depraved as Haman, albeit that he was the king’s favorite. To be the only one in a city office that does not laugh at the questionable story; to stand alone on shipboard against the gambling mania; to refuse to countenance cleverness which is divorced from cleanness, and genius which is apart from goodness—this is to do as Mordecai did in the gate of the king’s palace.

Only God can give this power, since of ourselves we are as reeds shaken by the wind. Sooner might a single ear of wheat resist the breeze that bends all its companions in the same direction, than we stand alone, while all our associates bow, unless God himself enable us.

But God is prepared to enable us. Listen: ‘I will strengthen thee; yea, I will help thee; yea, I will uphold thee with the right and of my righteousness.’ {Isa. 41:10} But the mistake we are so apt to make is to brace ourselves up by resolution and firm determination, in anticipation of some impending struggle. To do this is to fail. Live in Christ, look up into his face, derive from Him strength for the moment and at the moment; and often wrap about thee that exceeding great and precious promise, ‘I will make him to become a pillar in the temple of my God; and he shall go no more out; and I will write on him the name of my God.’ Oh to stand like a pillar amid men, bearing up the temple arch of truth, and inscribed with God’s name, while the crowds go and come on the pavement beneath!

F. B. Meyer, Our Daily Homily

A saint abroad, and a devil at home

The way in which a man lives in his home is vital. It will not do to be a saint abroad, and a devil at home! There are some of that kind. They are wonderfully sweet at church, but they are dreadfully sour to their wives and children. This will never do! Every genuine believer should say and mean it: “I will be careful to lead a blameless life . . . I will walk in my house with blameless heart.” Psalm 101:2

It is in the home that we get the truest proof of godliness.

“What sort of a man is he?” said one to George Whitefield, and Whitefield answered, “I cannot say, for I have never lived with him.”

The best way to test what a man really is, is to live with him.

– Charles Spurgeon

“I urge you to walk in a manner worthy of the calling to which you have been called, with all humility and gentleness, with patience, bearing with one another in love.” – Ephesians 4:1-2

Published in: on November 30, 2018 at 12:29 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: